*internet connection

I've been wanting to post something about what it's like to be, what most would categorized as, older and how modern technology and age don't often clash. Like how the younger generation looks at someone my age and laugh when we don't understand the new stuff coming out.

I've had this idea for sometime, being disconnected from the internet (what younger people think the world is), while traveling about. I've gone on a few vacations and small trips here and there. Each time I've had my internet connection come into question. And to be honest with how it affected me and why. That's a tricky part, being honest with one's self in todays world of over-sensitivity and excuse making. I'm not a snowflake. If you make a mistake, own up to it and learn from it. Don't look for a way to blame someone or something else for your problems. So, not being a teenager that thinks the world comes to an end when there is no internet connection, whats an older gentleman to do? Where do I turn?
nointernettoday-1
First I looked at some differences that I've noticed.

  1. My parents use the internet, albeit sparingly. If the internet goes down, my father will not likely notice. If cable goes out, he'll simply go find something to do like practice golf.
  2. Myself, I use the internet constantly. I was part of the internet before it became a thing and before smartphones with apps. Its really ingrained into my life, but not so much that I think I'll die without it. I can find something to do but soon will feel an emptiness.
  3. Teenagers and young adults. Take the internet away and they'll feel loss and soon begin to feel psychological withdrawls.

I've got a good connection from Frontier Communications at home. At work, same speeds. And I have this weird thing that when I go anywhere that has wi-fi, I'll run a speed test. If its a slow connection or they've got a QoS set up on it, I'll frown because in todays world theres not much reason. So if you're a business and you offer free wi-fi to your customers that is slow, I'm going to judge the hell out of you.

But when we go on a trip, I'll rely upon my AT&T cellular connection on my awesome iPhone (soon to be an iPhone X). In most places it allows me to surf, play games, and what not, in an acceptable manner. But when I go to Oklahoma to see parents and family, they're so far away from town the only broadband connection available is satellite. And its a really slow connection. But they're in the first group. Meaning they don't care if they have internet or its speed, just television. This leaves me to my iPhone with barely 1 bar of a 4G connection, I'm not going far.

h. t. t. p. s. ://. www. website. com  
connecting.....
connecting.....
connected
waiting on website......
waiting......
AAARRRRRGGGHHH!!!

rural-broadband-800x506
But why does this lack of internet connection bother me so much? I think its because the environment I'm in. Meaning, if I'm at home and my connection goes down then I'm going to find something else to do. But at the family's house, I'm not familiar so its less comfortable. In one instance I'm part of the 1st group, in another instance I'm in the 3rd group. So my finding is that the situation I'm in directly correlates to which group I belong to.

But that leads me to my next conclusion is that the internet connection is very much a part of my daily life. I rely upon it for many things such as communications, entertainment, weather, work, and training myself to become a programmer / developer. Without it, I have to fall back into my younger self that had to rely upon his own creative thoughts and logic processes. I usually get into trouble when that happens.

So on my vacation trip this Thanksgiving, my download speeds have been as such.

  • Dallas Home - 100Mbps +
  • Oklahoma - .25Mbps at best
  • St. Louis Hampton Inn - 4Mbps (faster speeds offered if you pay more)
  • Terre Haute Indiana - 30Mbps

Cellular signal strength was up and down most of the trip, so I didn't bother with it much while driving outside of checking the temperature.
no_internet
I've found that I feel more relaxed when I'm connected because its familiar to me. I know what is what, and where is where. But I find that I'm also able to fall back to the old me and figure things out myself again. Young adults seem to rely more on the internet, give information a value that doesn't truly exist, and seem more willing to give up on something instead of trying to figure it out themselves. Older adults are more likely to rely upon their own life experiences and friends than seek advice on the internet.

I think I'm closer to the 3rd group but have an easier ability to fall back into the 1st group as needed. The internet is a familiar neighborhood to me, so having access to it lets me have access to my friends and so forth. And while I can deal with watching old western television movies at a loud volume with family, it only lasts so long. I find myself looking to occupy my time elsewhere.

So there I have it, I'm addicted to the internet. Not as bad as some, worse than others. In fact, right now I'm at the dinner table. No televisions are turned on, no radios, just me and this laptop and a cup of coffee. Tonight will begin meal preparation for tomorrows feast. I'll hide downstairs and go over some of the RMOTR intro stuff and stay out of the way.

Happy Thanksgiving to everyone, everywhere. Rejoice for what you have in your world.

Link of the week is for The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win.